knox snooze

Succotash my Balzac, dipshiitake.

Bad comparison

While I think there is some legitimacy to the arguments Field Maloney makes about the significance of Owen Wilson's creative contributions to Wes Anderson's films, it's so not fair for Slate to tease the column on their front page "Owen Wilson, the Karl Rove of Hollywood." Unsung genius, perhaps. Baby-hating fatty, no.

Regardless, the piece is worth reading. Maloney begins the argument:
The disappointment was widespread, yet the critics at the major papers and the hipster blogs all overlooked one important fact: The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou was the first Wes Anderson film in which Owen Wilson didn't share the writing chores. What if Owen Wilson, America's resident goofy roué with the broken nose and the lazy nasal drawl, was the rudder keeping USS Anderson on course, steering its captain away from solipsism and ironic overload?

Notably absent from the piece are the exceptions to Owen Wilson's presumed genius - his headlong dives into some fuddy bombs (Zoolander, I Spy, and The Big Bounce come to mind). Sure, he has no writing credits on those, and the sweet bank he pulls down for them has got to be pretty hard to turn down. Shoot, he even gets to hang out with his bud Ben Stiller on the set. But these aren't exactly the mid-career moves of the next great American auteur

What I'm saying is, I think the guy is funny, talented, and probably an important part of Anderson's creative process. But I don't think he's the exclusive catalyst in Anderson's better films (those that are not The Life Aquatic...). Anderson has done one film without Owen Wilson as a writer, and it was not very good, but let's not jump to conclusions.

I can't believe I just wrote an entire post about this.
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7/27/2005 2:32 PM Anonymous Tha JZA

Me neither.    



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