knox snooze

Succotash my Balzac, dipshiitake.

I'm not the kind of person to go around saying, "I told you so," but I did. It turns out that the mayoral debate at Fulton High School was a little more exciting than the rest of the campaign thus far. Both of the candidates (mmm...candied dates) were more than ready to abandon the facade of cordiality they'd been presenting. I wasn't there, so I don't know who started it, but from what I can tell in the News-Sentinal (and who knows how much that is), Madeline came out the worse for it. That's not to say she was any worse than Haslam, but she's the underdog, and those sort of stabs and complaints tend to sound a bit like a tattletale, which is not necessarily bad, but doesn't do much for her image. Too bad it's gotten to this point. I was really hoping someone would rise above it. Oh well, the governor's race was much worse, and we got a great guv out of that. If Joe Sullivan is right, we'll have similar luck with Haslam.

Why wasn't I there, you ask. That's a good question. I thought I made it clear, I was at a reading. Wier was great. He read a new story called The Taste of Dirt. It was a sort of conscious memory exploration, recalling life in segregated Louisiana in the 60's. It's easy to do that sort of stuff and come of really cheesy, sentimental, and overly political about it. There wasn't any kind of agenda to the story, though. It was just a naked recollection. Wier's stuff is always rich with description and that sort of slow-voiced pace that Carver did so well. It was very good stuff. It'll be published in a literary magazine later this year, but I can't recall what one right now; someplace in Atlanta.
Stephen Corey, the poet/editor from The Georgia Review wasn't quite so hot. Some of his poetry was quite good, but I think that he was just a little too wispy at the podium. He didn't have much reading presence like Wier, and seemed almost apologetic with all of his work. He warned the audience at the beginning that he wouldn't preface any of his poems with explanations, that he would assume everyone in the room was smart enough to catch the references. When he proceeded to break that promise on nearly every poem, though, it was pretty clear he didn't think the audience was that smart at all. He read some from a cycle of poems that he said were short pieces, short enough to fit on a motel memo pad. They were quite good, but would have been better if he hadn't set us up for short poems, which I think of as ten lines or less, and ambushed us with pieces that were clearly not short. It probably would have all been better in my memory if he hadn't saved a ten minute piece for last.
« Home | Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »
| Next »

» Post a Comment